Study Estimates Radiation Dose, Cancer Risk From Coronary Artery Calcium Screening

A study based on computer modeling of radiation risk suggests that widespread screening for the buildup of calcium in the arteries using computed tomography scans would lead to an estimated 42 additional radiation-induced cancer cases per 100,000 men and 62 cases per 100,000 women, according to a report in the July 13 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Coronary artery calcification is associated with coronary artery disease. "Computed tomography (CT) has been proposed as a tool for routine screening for coronary artery calcification in asymptomatic individuals as part of a comprehensive risk assessment," the authors write as background information in the article. Evidence suggests that this type of screening may detect the presence of calcium in the arteries of individuals who would be at low risk when assessed by traditional risk factors. "However, the potential risks of screening, including the risk of radiation-induced cancer, have to be considered along with the potential benefits."

source: Medical News`Today

1 comment:

David said...

Weighing the pros and cons of screening is one of those common issues. Especially when tests have false positives and so on.