Neusoft Medical's Latest Innovation, NeuViz 16 CT Scanner, Approved by FDA for the U.S. Market

SHENYANG, China, July 24 /PRNewswire-Asia/ -- Neusoft Medical Systems Co., Ltd. (Neusoft Medical), a wholly owned subsidiary of Neusoft Corporation (600718.SH), officially announced that its newly developed Computed Tomography(CT) system, NeuViz 16 multi-slice CT scanner, has been approved by the FDA recently, and is also marked as the first of its kind in China. As its first 16 multi-slice CT scanner was shipped to its U.S.-based customers recently, Neusoft Medical has made its newest innovation entered into the global high-end medical market, indicating another breakthrough for the company in the field of high-end medical equipment, following its introduction of PET system in May 2009.

NeuViz 16 multi-slice CT scanner is designed with the latest integrated detector for optimized SNR and scanning time, and its patented technology of dynamic focal spot ensures a higher spatial resolution during scanning and creates more detailed 3D/MPR images. The product also features DoseRight Modulation as well as a pediatric protocol to ensure optimized dose without compromising image quality.

source: PR Newswire


Low-Dose CT Method, Delivering 50% Less Radiation, Correctly Identifies Patients with Appendicitis

Patients with possible appendicitis are typically evaluated using a standard-dose contrast enhanced CT, but a low-dose unenhanced CT that delivers approximately 50% less radiation is just as effective, according to a study performed at the Seoul National University College of Medicine in Seoul, Korea. The standard-dose enhanced CT scan delivers approximately 8.0 mSv of radiation; the low-dose unenhanced CT scan delivers approximately 4.2 mSv of radiation.

A total of 78 patients with appendicitis were all evaluated using both the standard-dose and low-dose methods. CT images were then reviewed by two separate radiologists. Radiologist number one was able to correctly identify appendicitis in 77/78 patients using the low-dose unenhanced method and in 78/78 using the standard-dose enhanced method. Radiologist number two was able to correctly identify appendicitis in all 78 patients using both methods.

“Considering the high incidence of appendicitis in the general population and the rapidly increasing use of CT, small individual risks applied to such an increasingly large population may create a public health issue in the future,” said Kyoung Ho Lee, MD, lead author of the study.

source: ARRS


Study Estimates Radiation Dose, Cancer Risk From Coronary Artery Calcium Screening

A study based on computer modeling of radiation risk suggests that widespread screening for the buildup of calcium in the arteries using computed tomography scans would lead to an estimated 42 additional radiation-induced cancer cases per 100,000 men and 62 cases per 100,000 women, according to a report in the July 13 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Coronary artery calcification is associated with coronary artery disease. "Computed tomography (CT) has been proposed as a tool for routine screening for coronary artery calcification in asymptomatic individuals as part of a comprehensive risk assessment," the authors write as background information in the article. Evidence suggests that this type of screening may detect the presence of calcium in the arteries of individuals who would be at low risk when assessed by traditional risk factors. "However, the potential risks of screening, including the risk of radiation-induced cancer, have to be considered along with the potential benefits."

source: Medical News`Today


Using Structural MRI May Help Accurately Diagnose Dementia Patients: Mayo Clinic Study

A new Mayo Clinic study may help physicians differentially diagnose three common neurodegenerative disorders in the future. The study was presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease on July 11 in Vienna.

In this study, Mayo Clinic researchers developed a framework for MRI-based differential diagnosis of three common neurodegenerative disorders: Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and Lewy body disease using Structural MRI. Currently, examination of the brain at autopsy is the only way to confirm with certainty that a patient had a specific form of dementia. The framework, which is called "STructural Abnormality iNDex" or STAND-Map, shows promise in accurately diagnosing dementia patients while they are alive. The rationale is that if each neurodegenerative disorder can be associated with a unique pattern of atrophy specific on MRI, then it may be possible to differentially diagnose new patients.

source: Medical News Today


Cardiac CT Is More Cost Effective When Managing Low-Risk Patients with Chest Pain in the Emergency Department

The use of cardiac CT for low-risk chest pain patients in the emergency department, instead of the traditional standard of care (SOC) workup, may reduce a patient’s length of stay and hospital charges, according to a study performed at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. The SOC workup, which is timely and expensive, consists of a series of cardiac enzyme tests, ECGs and nuclear stress testing.

Fifty patients were included in the study. “We found that cardiac CT based workups in low risk chest pain patients decreased the length of hospital stay up to 20 hours and was significantly cheaper (44% less) than using the standard of care workup,” said Janet May, MS, lead author of the study. “The SOC mean length of stay was 25.4 hours and the mean length of stay for cardiac CT with observation was 14.3 hours. The mean charges for SOC were $7,597; the mean charges for cardiac CT with observation were $6,153; and the mean charges for cardiac CT without observation were $4,251,” said May.

“Delivering care through emergency departments is expensive, so cost containment in that setting is critical. Over six million patients present to US emergency rooms each year with chest pain and up to 79% of those patients fall into the low-risk category,” she said.

“Our study shows that cardiac CT has the potential to significantly reduce cost and length of stay in the emergency department by rapidly identifying those patients who can safely be discharged quickly,” said May.

source: ARRS


Mouse Study Shows PET Can Measure Effectiveness Of Novel Breast Cancer Treatment

A new study published in the July issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine shows that positron emission tomography (PET) scans in mice can be used to determine whether a novel type of breast cancer treatment is working as intended. Researchers successfully used PET and a specially-developed radioactive compound to image HER2 - a protein often associated with aggressive breast cancer - in breast cancer cells before and after treatment aimed at decreasing HER2 expression. This molecular imaging methodology could facilitate development of new targeted therapies not only for breast cancer, but also for certain types of ovarian, prostate, and lung cancers that may be aggravated due to HER2.

"Obtaining an accurate assessment of the HER2 expression levels in breast cancer tumors is absolutely essential to know whether treatment aimed at reduction of the protein levels in tumor cells is effective," said Jacek Capala, senior author of the study and investigator for the radiation oncology branch of the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. "Our study indicates that PET could be a powerful tool both to identify patients who might benefit from targeted molecular therapies and to manage their care by measuring response to treatment. As research into HER2 therapies continues, similar techniques could be developed for other cancers overexpressing different proteins."

source: Medical News Today